Why Do Dogs Drag Their Butts: The Answer Will Surprise You

Dogs are known for their adorable waggly tails, but have you ever stopped to wonder why do dogs drag their butts along the ground? It’s not just a behavioral quirk – there are actually some very good reasons for it, some of which may surprise you.

From how to reduce your dog’s scooting to when to call your vet, we cover it all. We also delve into the top 6 reasons why dogs drag their butts.

So keep reading to find out more about what could be causing your pooch’s behind shenanigans!

Why Do Dogs Drag Their Butts? 6 Dog Scooting Reasons

There are several reasons why your dog might be scooting their bottom along the ground. Some of these are medical conditions that will require treatment from your veterinarian, while others are simply part of your dog’s natural anatomy or grooming habits.

#1 – Skin Infection

One of the most common reasons for a dog to drag its butt is an underlying skin condition. Skin infections, hot spots, and allergies can all cause your dog to feel the need to scratch or lick its hind end. 

This can lead to irritation, redness, and even hair loss in some cases.

If you notice your dog scooting more than usual, take a closer look at its backside. Are they licking or scratching their butt excessively? Do they have any bald spots or red patches of skin? 

These could all be signs of a skin infection or other medical condition.

dog sitting on his butt

#2 – Trauma to Their Anal Sacs

Your dog’s anal sacs are two small glands located on either side of the anus. These sacs produce a foul-smelling liquid that helps your dog mark their territory.

Sometimes, these sacs can become impacted or infected, which can be extremely painful for your dog. Impacted anal sacs often need to be expressed manually by a veterinarian.

Infected anal sacs, on the other hand, will usually require antibiotics to clear up. If you notice your dog scooting and licking their backside more than usual, it could be a sign that their anal sacs are causing them discomfort.

#3 – Allergies (Pollen, Mold, Food, Etc)

Seasonal allergies are just as common in dogs as they are in people. If your dog is allergic to something in their environment, they may start scooting their butt along the ground in an attempt to relieve the itching and irritation.

Common allergens that can cause this reaction include pollen, mold, dust mites, and even certain foods.

If you notice your dog scooting more during certain times of the year or after they eat certain foods, it could be an allergic reaction. A tip on allergies treatment – get a test as soon as you can so you can treat it early.

#4 – Clogged Anal Sacs

As we mentioned before, your dog’s anal sacs produce a foul-smelling liquid that helps them mark their territory. This liquid is normally emptied when your dog poops, but sometimes it can become clogged.

When this happens, the sacs can become enlarged and uncomfortable. Your dog may try to relieve the pressure by scooting its butt along the ground.

If you think your dog’s anal sacs may be clogged, it’s best to take them to the vet so they can be expressed properly. Trying to do it yourself can be difficult and even dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing.

#5 – Intestinal Parasites (Tapeworms)

Intestinal parasites or tapeworms in dogs are one of the most common health problems in most breeds. These parasites can cause a variety of symptoms, including weight loss, diarrhea, and vomiting.

cute dog looking up

One of the less common symptoms of intestinal parasites is anal itching. If your dog is dragging its butt along the ground more than usual, it could be a sign that they have tapeworms or other intestinal parasites.

A simple stool sample can confirm whether or not your dog has parasites. If they do, your vet will prescribe the appropriate medication to get rid of them.

#6 – Behavioral Problems

In some cases, a dog may start scooting their butt on the ground as a result of boredom or anxiety. This is more common in dogs that are left alone for long periods or don’t have enough to do.

If you think your dog’s scooting might be due to a behavioral issue, try adding some new toys or activities to their routine. You might also want to talk to a veterinarian or dog behaviorist for more advice.

Reduce Your Dog’s Scooting With These Home Remedies

While scooting is usually nothing to worry about, it can be annoying for both you and your dog. Luckily, there are a few things you can do to help reduce the amount of scooting your dog does.

Add More Fiber to Your Dog’s Diet

Adding a bit of fiber to your dog’s diet can help firm up their stools, which may reduce the need to scoot. Try adding a spoonful of canned pumpkin (not the pie filling) to your dog’s food once or twice a day.

Inspect for Parasites

As we mentioned before, intestinal parasites can sometimes cause a dog to scoot. Doing a regular check for parasites can help prevent this issue. If you think your dog has parasite symptoms, simply look for small worms in your dog’s stool.

If you see anything unusual, take a sample of your dog’s stool to the vet for testing.

Limit Exposure to Allergens

If your dog is allergic to something in their environment, limiting their exposure to the allergen can help reduce scooting.

This may mean keeping them indoors during pollen season or switching to hypoallergenic dog food.

dog laying on the grass

Feed Your Dog a High-quality Diet

A healthy diet is important for all dogs, but it can be especially helpful for those that scoot. Feeding your dog a high-quality diet can help reduce anal sac problems and improve overall digestive health. For instance, feed your dog things like:

  • High-fiber dog food
  • Probiotics
  • Canned pumpkin
  • Omega-3 supplements

When Can Be Serious And You Should See a Vet

Most of the time, scooting is nothing to worry about and can be resolved with simple home remedies. However, there are a few cases where you should take your dog to the vet for further evaluation.

If your dog is scooting more than usual or if the problem seems to be getting worse, make an appointment with your veterinarian.

When To Call Your Vet?

If your dog is scooting and also has any of the following symptoms, it’s time to give your vet a call:

  • Blood in the stool
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • A swollen or painful abdomen

These symptoms could indicate a more serious underlying condition that needs to be treated by a veterinarian.

If you’re not sure whether or not your dog’s scooting is serious, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and make an appointment with your vet. They’ll be able to give you the all-clear or diagnose and treat any underlying conditions.

People Also Ask

Is It Normal for Dogs To Drag Their Butt on the Floor?

While it’s not exactly normal, it’s also not unusual for dogs to drag their butts on the floor from time to time. There are a number of reasons why your dog might do this, including allergies, anal sac problems, and intestinal parasites.

How Do I Get My Dog To Stop Scooting?

If you want to get your dog to stop scooting, there are a few things you can try. Adding fiber to their diet, switching to hypoallergenic dog food, and feeding them probiotics can help reduce scooting. You should also inspect your dog for parasites and limit their exposure to allergens.

Why Does My Dog Scoot After Pooping?

There are a few reasons why your dog might scoot after pooping. It could be that they have an anal sac problem or that they’re trying to clean themselves off. It’s also possible that there’s something in their environment that’s irritating their skin, such as pollen or grass.

Does a Dog Scooting Mean Worms?

While it’s possible that your dog has worms if they’re scooting, there are several other potential causes of this behavior. If you’re concerned that your dog has worms, the best thing to do is take a sample of their stool to the vet for testing.

Conclusion

Scooting is a common behavior in dogs, and there are a number of potential causes. In most cases, it’s nothing to worry about and can be resolved with simple home remedies.

However, if your dog is scooting more than usual or if the problem seems to be getting worse, it’s time to call the vet. They’ll be able to diagnose and treat any underlying conditions.

Similarly, if your dog is scooting and also has any other symptoms, such as diarrhea, constipation, or vomiting, it’s time to see the vet. These symptoms could indicate a more serious underlying condition.

However, as mentioned above, most of the time scooting is nothing to worry about and is simply a dog’s way of dealing with an itch or irritation.

Have you ever noticed your dog scooting his but? What did you do to prevent it?

Photo of author

Lovelia Horn

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